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Beekeeping in New Zealand

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Apiculture NZ president Bruce Wills has said that the current year has been a difficult one for the industry and it’s main concern is finding new markets for the surplus honey produced by hives. In the last year, New Zealand made over $505 million in revenue from honey sales, but this year is far from promising. Wills explained that in the last twelve months or so, hives have produced less than half of their usual honey which is a worrying trend. With demand in China rising, and with farmers in New Zealand struggling to keep up with production increases, demand is rising for locally produced honey also.

How to Beekeeping in New Zealand

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Beekeeping is an extremely successful industry in New Zealand, and as New Zealand’s largest city, Auckland is an excellent place for starting a beekeeping business. There are several beekeeping clubs in Auckland, with the biggest of these being the Beekeepers Association of New Zealand (BAANZ). Although members of this association can be qualified beekeepers, membership isn’t mandatory. To become a full member you will have to be a registered beekeeper with the Health Ministry, who will assess your eligibility based on the type of bets you wish to raise, and the location on your property where you want to raise your bees. The assessment process is undertaken after a thorough assessment of your individual circumstances, so it’s well worth getting your application in right through the door if you are thinking about starting a beekeeping business in Auckland.

As a country located in the southern hemisphere, New Zealand has an abundant supply of raw materials that is both beneficial to local producers but also very attractive to international buyers. Amongst the major agricultural exports are fresh produce, including many varieties of locally grown fruit, including passion fruit, Brazil fruit, melons, apples, pears, strawberries, and many more. If you’re interested in opening a beekeeping business in New Zealand, then it’s worth looking into importing your favourite varieties from Zealand and selling them domestically or internationally, or simply looking into the possibility of building your own home farm where you can grow your own honey, pump up your own bees, and stock up on your favourite herbs and spices.

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